Attack and Defense phalanx, Flag position

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UEV
Posts: 36
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2008 8:50 pm

Attack and Defense phalanx, Flag position

Post by UEV » Thu May 01, 2008 10:38 am

The front row consisting of nine squares is the attack phalanx. Fill these squares with at least three of your seven strong pieces, three of your middle ranks and two or three privates. The attack phalanx is your front row offense against your opponent's and enables you to "visualize" his arrangement during the initial clash. It is in this initial stage of the game that psywar tactics, decoys deployment, bluffing, bluff calls, privates and spies hunting, foresight of placements or visualization are employed. The initial stage is when you draw first blood with a pre-emptive first strike. The objective here is to put your opponent on the defensive to dominate the tempo of moves and to visualize his arrangements before he can even initiate any attack. The initial stage determines whether you have an upperhand to follow thru in the middle game and does make a difference between winning or losing. The strong pieces may clash head on while the middle ranks act as decoys to detect the position of strong pieces, splits or eliminate privates. The three privates may also be used as counter decoys, attacking or challenging any suspected strong piece to see if it could be a spy. Should the private lose, it will project an illusion as if you were losing a general, that is assuming you didn't hit a weak piece. In so doing, you may coincidentally eliminate a spy or split with another private.

The second or middle row consisting of the next nine squares is your defense phalanx. Fill these squares with the remaining strong pieces, middle ranks and privates or even your flag. A variation from the orthodox back row flag position confuses the opponent from detecting the flag amongst the nine pieces of the defense phalanx. This also puts the flag in a vantage position just in case the opponent makes a blunder in guarding his back row or had his flag threatened ahead of yours. Note: The defense phalanx is actually a reinforcement of the attack phalanx. This acts as a secondary shield against the remaining untested pieces which may survive your front row attack phalanx. For instance, when your attack phalanx charges forward and some of the opponent's pieces may slip inward, the defense phalanx must be able to neutralize these. Do not involve your defense phalanx unnecessarily. The main purpose of this reinforcement is to shield against untested pieces that may slip inwards when your attack phalanx charges forward. The opponent may as well have a secondary attack phalanx to follow thru with his initial attack. If you involve your defense phalanx prematurely, you will only cramp your manuevering spaces and expose your flag and back row unnecessarily. The opponent may be luring all your pieces intentionally towards him to clear your back row and throw your guards out of the diagonal reach. When your attack phalanx is exhausted, the defense phalanx takes over during the middle game stage.

The last row consisting of back row nine squares is your flag position phalanx. Fill these squares with the last (three) remaining pieces which you want to decoy as your flag. As orthodox, you may place your real flag in this back row because it is loose, has a lot of manuevering spaces and farthest from the line of conflict.

The essence of these arrangements is to maintain the ratio of one is to one or greater for each untested piece but not necessarily to eliminate each. Do not bother to waste your moves chasing tested pieces. It is not necessary to eliminate all your opponent's pieces in order to capture his flag. Though you may need to clean up or lure some of his pieces inwards so that his back row is clear enough for you to cross.
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